Jul 252014
 
TumblrShare

Here’s a batshit insane story, to quote from one of my Twitter acquaintances, Adrian Short:

Batshit insane Tory MP David Tredinnick wants more astrology in healthcare: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-28464009 …

And here’s the story he links to:

A Conservative MP has spoken of his belief in astrology and his desire to incorporate it into medicine.

David Tredinnick said he had spent 20 years studying astrology and healthcare and was convinced it could work.

The MP for Bosworth, a member of the health committee and the science and technology committee, said he was not afraid of ridicule or abuse.

The MP in question goes on to describe astrology as something with a “proven track record”.  Proven, I suppose, as much as Tory economics has shown itself able to serve the nation equitably.

But Short makes a follow-up comment which really does interest me:

Which makes me wonder how we regulate negligence and misconduct in medical astrology.

Considering that so much of what the public-sector NHS is now carrying out is under the immediate control and management of private-sector companies, and considering that clinical negligence has been taken out of scope of Legal Aid provision, you might very well ask the same question of traditional non-batshit-insane medicine: without emanation of the state, without Legal Aid, effectively you have a system built not only to enable wide-ranging freedoms for medical corporations to do as they wish but also for MPs like David Tredinnick – and the similarly curious – to bring to our GP surgeries such prejudice-based treatments.

If I were a conspiracy theorist, I’d suggest that it was all part of a whole.  Instead, I’ll simply remind us that battles must be fought by those most affected.  And we are now clearly those most affected by all this prejudice.


TumblrShare

Comment is no longer free

I’m finding it increasingly difficult to comment on a whole host of matters.  Even where I do manage to type out eight hundred words of thoughts, half of what I write is so carefully pre-edited as to make me feel the only thing I’m learning to do of late is self-censor my output more ingeniously. [...]

“Citizen Kane 2.0″ – a new direction for a journalism of democracy

Yesterday, I read this phrase quoted from Tim O’Reilly (the bold is mine): We couldn’t agree more: “Technology should be about values with people at the centre” @timoreilly #OSCON2014 #OSCON This afternoon, meanwhile, I read three amazing articles – all of which, in some way, may lead to a final fixing of our broken political [...]

From Kafka to Original Sin 2.0

Two bloody awful pieces of rubbish which came my way today. Rubbish not because they themselves are rubbish.  Rubbish because they just had to be made. The first is this brilliant website from Open Rights Group.  The video they crowdfunded is below. http://youtu.be/60eKauWFFPk It explains quite clearly the idiocy of British government Internet filter policy. [...]

Shit hits the fan – and so journalists become the fans of shit

I started thinking about the subject of journalism this morning, via a tweet from the always excellent Rob Manuel.  As often happens with what he sends round the ether, you smile, learn and continue to think once his thought passes you by.  This was the tweet in question: Jon Snow has started doing gonzo journalism. [...]

From the rooftops of democracy: “STOP NAYSAYING OUR HUMAN RIGHTS!”

The Guardian reported around a day ago that: Two leading Westminster civil liberties campaigners, David Davis and Tom Watson, are to mount a high court legal challenge to the government’s new “emergency” surveillance law, which was rushed through parliament last week. The application for a judicial review of the new legislation, which was passed with [...]

On Blair, Labour unity and the cheerleaders of the left

A couple of articles I’ve read this morning.  The first, from Labour List, documents how Labour has achieved magnificent unity at the weekend – coinciding, coincidentally, with my decision to leave the Party after ten years’ membership as a result of the cack-handed and antidemocratic #DRIP process (more here).  (At least I can draw the [...]

“Diktat 2015″

Imagine the script, if you will. “Diktat 2015″ Part II – 2014 Scene I – February – #caredata The British government claims to have had a very bright idea: release all NHS patient medical records in England for use by the life-science industry to improve patient outcomes and research opportunities.  The system will involve an [...]

On normalising surveillance – the good, the bad and the personal

I’m a member of Open Rights Group, the Fabians and Labour.  I also remain an associate member of the small trades union Accord.  The latter is more out of sentiment than practicality.  I no longer work in the sector where it operates, but the people who run it treated me well.  The add-on legal and [...]

democracy | rest in peace

I just tweeted in rather ironic tone the following: Plaything of cybercriminal, paedophile, govt – even social-network users for goodness sake! – the web’s breaking up like a rusting old car. I’d just read this, where under current legislation (significantly, no need for #DRIP here), but with new process and procedure, forty-five police forces have [...]

The logical result of representative democracy

Sunny has an excellent summary of all the issues surrounding #DRIP, especially in relation to the mess on civil liberties which my own political party, Labour, now finds itself irremediably in.  You can find this summary here (whilst I have previously posted here and here).  One of the most important points he makes is this [...]

#DRIP – a state-run Facebook imposed on every UK Internet user

I posted recently, unwisely I suppose, on the Facebooking of the political party I belong to – the Labour Party.  Today, I realise this has extended to the whole British body politic, state, security services and every citizen who lives on our islands. The Guardian reports the so-called #DRIP lawmaking process thus: Forty-nine MPs have [...]

Anecdotal evidence for a decline in pharmacy standards

I thought I’d be as formal in my post’s title as possible today.  As of yesterday, I have an official complaint lodged with NHS England about procedure and process at our local pharmacy.  This comes on the back of an error committed last year by the pharmacy I used to use. I’ve had epilepsy for [...]

Privacy concerns making me a Luddite? Yes, siree! (And I really ain’t happy …)

First, we had #FacebookExperiment, where Facebook took it upon itself, for a week or so in January 2012, to make people happy or sad by deliberately manipulating the kind of content they saw.  Now we have #DarpaExperiment: Several of the DoD-funded projects went further than simple observation, instead engaging directly with social media users and [...]