Dec 102006
 
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A report from CBS on today’s Nobel Peace Prizes:

Bangladeshi economist Muhammad Yunus, often called the banker to the poor, received the Nobel Peace Prize on Sunday for his efforts to relieve poverty as a cornerstone for building peace.

[...]

Yunus, 66, often called the banker to the poor, shared the coveted award with his creation, Grameen Bank, for helping people, even beggars, rise above poverty by giving them microcredit — small, usually unsecured loans. The Bangladeshi economist is the developer and founder of the concept of microcredit.

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Dec 102006
 
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A thought-provoking article from Thomas Catan writing in the Times a couple of weeks ago. The key to understanding the process behind what’s been going on is, I think, the natural common sense of the Spanish. Whether one is on the right or the left of the political spectrum, a Spaniard will, above all, show common sense.

The only way to have survived forty years of oppression, and come out the other end without further terrible bloodshed. Even with a history of terrible bloodshed behind them.

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Dec 102006
 
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One of the world’s most influential media outlets? And all for just $2 million?

Nothing happens these days that does not happen on the web. In Britain, America and across the world newspapers face declining sales and falling revenue as the advertising industry moves online. Journalists are being laid off everywhere. All Britain’s major newspapers, from the Guardian to the Times, are ploughing huge resources into their websites, even as they scratch their heads wondering how to make them profitable. Even the venerable New York Times is struggling to establish an online presence. The whole landscape is shifting. There are now 115m MySpace members. Google paid an astonishing $1.65bn for YouTube. As the economy changes beyond recognition, these companies are shaping up to become the new Wal-Mart and General Motors.

In this case, we’re talking about the Huffington Post.

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